Category Archives: Uncategorized

St Brigid Day

St Brigid

*Picture source: google images*

St. Brigid of Kildare (c 451-550):

According to tradition, Brigid was born in the year 451 AD in Ireland. Tradition says that her mother was Brocca, a Christian pict slave who had been baptized by Saint Patrick and her father as Dubhthach, a chieftain of Leinster.

As she grew older, Brigid performed miracles, including healing and feeding the poor. According to one story, as a child, she once gave away her mother’s entire store of butter. The butter was then replenished in answer to Brigid’s prayers. Her habit of charity led her to donate her father’s belongings to anyone who asked. Dubthach was so annoyed with her that he took her in a chariot to the king of Leinster to sell her. While Dubthach was talking to the king, Brigid gave away his jeweled sword to a beggar to barter it for food to feed his family. The king decided not to keep her. Brigid went on to establish and lead several abbeys, which is represented in the icon by her shepherd’s crook. Women kept the sacred flame at the Kildare abbey walls which is represented in the icon by the flames behind the St. Brigid cross.

Brigid is the patron saint of cattle, fire,blacksmiths, poets, motherhood, abundance, and healers.

Here is a link to a video showing you how to make a St. Brigid’s cross: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WErPG3DiT24

The Kinship Project

On 2 February 2020, I presented the following forum at my church. It is part of an ongoing parish spiritual formation series.

The Kinship Project: Protecting, Enriching, and Serving our Immediate Environment

We are at a crossroads. The science is clear. We must reduce our carbon emissions (and carbon equivalent emissions). We have a decade, at best, to make significant changes or we will face a future that looks radically different than our past, our future, or the hope filled world of Star Trek. It is a world where untold millions will suffer from extreme temperatures (hot and cold), fires, blizzards, tornadoes, hurricanes, crop failure, drought, floods, famine, disease . . . but, it doesn’t have to be like that. We, as individuals, can do a lot. We can speak truth to our churches, our neighborhood communities, our cities, our mayor, our Governor, our Members of Congress, our President, etc. We can practice truth by reducing our own CO ee emissions.

These facts are causing stress and anxiety among our younger generations. They see and know that they are the ones who will live and die with these changes. As I watch the young climate activists, I notice they all have the same exasperation. We tell you the facts, and you do nothing. We tell you that we are less likely to die of old age than you are, and you do nothing. We tell you that the world is in crisis, and you recite “fairy tales of eternal economic growth” and do nothing.

We have failed our younger generation. We have failed them and we wonder why they don’t show up at our church doors.

<Note: As of January 2019, according to the IPCC, we had a carbon budget of 360 gigatons before we reached the tipping point. That is total gigatons, not per annum, left to emit.>

With all this swirling in my head, as I stopped to think about this forum, as I double-checked my research, one thing became crystal clear to me. No amount of knowledge, no amount of scientific fact, no list I give you can really make a difference.

The only thing I have to offer is a “why” :: a value statement. Values aren’t understood simply by our intellect. They are understandings derived from inner experience.

As our Presiding Bishop often reminds us, This is the Way of Love. Where does this idea of love being the center come from? . . . <Read Matt 22: 36-40>

  • Love God
  • Love neighbor

And so I’d like to share the Creation Story of our Kin the Hebrews . . . <Read Gen 2, creation of man>

  • man formed of soil :: stresses our kinship and dependence, we are made of earth not just upon earth
  • till :: ‘avad
    • to cultivate
    • a right to make a living from the soil, we must work the soil to eat from the soil
  • keep :: shamar
    • to preserve, to defend
    • a duty to care for the soil, we need the soil and it needs us.

I would like to suggest that these biblical ideals (Love God, Love Neighbor, Protect the Garden) serve as our reason for practicing Creation Care.

The IPCC suggests that each person living with a carbon budget of 2-3 tonnes per year is the target we should be aiming for. <Of course, businesses must also follow the guidelines, but as they say, “vote with your dollar” and the companies will listen.>

  • Worldwide average = 4 tonnes
  • American average = 21 tonnes
  • That is roughly an 85% decrease in individual emissions.

The factors that have the largest impact on your carbon footprint are:

  • the number of children you choose to have
  • food choices = agricultural methods, meat consumption, plastic wrap, shipping distance, biodiversity
  • Housing = electricity (coal, natural gas), heating and cooling, refrigerator, hot water, washing machine, lighting, landscape maintenance,
  • Personal transport = car, fuel, planes (vs buses and trains)
  • Consumer goods = use of plastic, fast fashion, banking, electronics, healthcare, entertainment, education, lawn

Let’s have a family meeting and see what we can think of . . . remembering that we are focusing on our immediate environment.

When Martin Luther was asked what he would do if the world was ending tomorrow, he replied, “Plant a Tree.”

53

from Nov 2020

I turned 53 a few days ago. My family and best friends gave me some really thoughtful gifts: books that they know deserve a place on my shelves, a new colorful reusable water/tea/coffee bottle, and consumable teas. It was just perfect.

I have no major changes or goals for the coming year. I’m in a good place and healthy this year.

52

Another year older, hopefully a bit wiser, hopefully much kinder, and definitely more grey — in essence the same.

I’m still pondering the song “What kind of world do you want?” and still singing “Crazy Horses”. I still love Matt Smith as the Doctor (Doctor Who). My favorite kind of veg-out book is still post-apocalypse.

BookNotes: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Repost from other blog —

Oh my! I learned so much science reading/listening to this book. I also learned how much science I simply assume all people understand. It was eye opening to learn about people who do not have that fundamental knowledge.

This is so much more than the story of HeLa cells and Henrietta Lacks, it is a story about presumption that occurred (and still occurs) in the medical and scientific communities. I’d like to hope these things don’t happen anymore, but I am uncertain.

Renaissance Fair 2018

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April 2018

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Planning 

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More planning

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young peach tree

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Compost 1

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young cherry

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turning over garden bed 

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leveling the pool area

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mature apple

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view of the front yard from clothesline to west

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view of the eastern half of the backyard

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cistern 2: a work in progress

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new trees in the old meadow

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thistle patch

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Meadow (with new trees)

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Established paths in woods

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This just calls for a hammock

Chlorophytum comosum

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AKA: Spider plant

Care Instructions:
Light: bright, indirect light
Water: likes to dry out a bit between watering
Container Size: prefers a to be a bit root bound
Fertilize:
Temperature: above 50°, prefers cool

gingersnaps

Because my mom asked:

Gingersnaps

3/4 cup butter, softened

1 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup molasses

1 egg

2 1/4 cups sifted all purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

In a large bowl, combine the butter, brown sugar, molasses, and egg.

In a medium bowl, mix together the dry ingredients.

Add the dry ingredients to the wet and stir to combine.

Put 1/2 cup granulated sugar in a small bowl.

Roll dough into small balls, then  roll in granulated sugar.

Place on cookie sheet with parchment paper.

Bake for 10-12 minutes.

Christmas 2017

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More Organ work

Paths

A relatively new path being formed into the center section of our woods. Jasper has gotten so much better about taking walks now that he can stay on the soft earth.

Eclipse 2017

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New Roof

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March 1, 2017

Feb 28, 2017

What a mess. . .

10 years

I’ve been blogging here since very early 2007. This blog had grown to such a huge monster that I left it for a time before coming back. Now as the new year starts, I decided to clean house. I kept a few posts from years gone by, but deleted a great quantity of posts (over 700!)

What’s left is a good sampling of what was important in past years along with family photos and memories.

Going forward this blog will become more curated . . . meaning I will keep the best and delete the rest. 2016 posts will remain up until the same month in 2017, then I’ll sort through and decide what to keep and what to let go of. In some respects this is the exact way I handle my journals. I burn them in a “ritual” each year on New Year’s Eve.

Season of Creation, D 26

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I’ve added a new piece to my line-up of “stuff to take when going out kit.” Now, along with my Klean Kanteen, bandana/napkin, and wooden spoon (because I seem to have misplaced my silicon spoon) I have a stainless steel food container. It has a really tight fitting lid and clamps to hold the lid down. I can take lunch or a snack with me or . . . Super exciting I can use it like a doggie bag without the styrofoam container. This makes me super happy. I don’t eat out very often, but when I do I always have a good bit of the meal leftover. Sometimes I bring it home despite the styrofoam. But this thing, it is a game changer for me!

New Orleans — 2016

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Earth Day

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“Lose the earthquakes–Keep the faults, fill the oceans without the salt. Let every man own his own hand.” World by Five for Fighting

“Can you dig it, baby?” Oh yes, yes indeed, I can. Creation care is a very important aspect of my faith and life. I strive to be a good steward of this beautiful home we all live upon. I’m not perfect, there is certainly much room for improvement, but I can honestly say I am aware, careful, and deliberate.

Here are some of my easy-peasy habits:

reusable water bottle
cloth napkins
reusable grocery bags
turn off the faucet
turn off the light
walk (or bike) more, drive less
shop thrift stores
grow some food
famers’ markets
hang your clothes and lose the dryer
Tomorrow’s calling . . .